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May 18, 2007

Comments

Martin

I've had this thought for a while...tell me if you think it's relevant. I've noticed that certain types of people flock to certain types of ministries. For instance, I've known PCA people at Campus Outreach, RUF, Wesley, Crossroads, The Connection (PABC). And it's interesting how the majority of people who attend whatever ministry are quite similar. I hate stereotyping but artsy people are more at RUF and Wesley, greek people are more at Campus Outreach and Crossroads, southern folk are more at PABC and BSU. I wonder if it's the actual people who draw others to their ministry more so than how worship is done and how much they like the speaker. Is this consumerism? Or is some of this natural? Or is some of this how God designed the kingdom to work and possibly why he made us all so different? I could see arguments for all. But then also, no doubt the gospel allows us to love and enjoy people who are drastically different than us. Where will we see that take place if everyone at our church is exactly the same as us?

Matt Adair

Martin - it's relevant...

I do think that most churches and ministries are fueled primarily by attractional principles that almost demand homogeneity. My concern is that there is a growing number of people who are turned off by the clone mentality that takes place far too often.

Part of our struggle is that the church should approach the world with both an open hand and a closed hand, yet far too often we put the wrong stuff in the wrong hands. Most people make closed-hand decisions on the basis of preferences that should remain open-handed. People are far more adamant about styles of worship than they are about whether the church or ministry actually preaches the gospel.

Last time I checked, the church in the New Testament was pretty radically diverse. The gospel should be drawing different kinds of people to Jesus - our challenge is that consumerism almost demands boutique religion with a custom-designed Jesus.

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